Saturday, July 25, 2020

Where Long Beach Suffragists Lived and Met

Much of the early work on suffrage was done in the homes of women who held "precinct teas" and discussions. 

The first meetings of the Women's Suffrage Club of Long Beach in 1895, were held in the homes of Mrs. Williams who lived at First and Alamitos and Miss Fette, who resided at the corner of Magnolia Avenue and Second Street.

In 1896, women met at the Long Beach Methodist Tabernacle at E 3rd St & N Locust Ave, to rally voters and display suffrage colors of yellow, white and purple. Their work resulted in Long Beach carrying Los Angeles County for suffrage. 

In 1911, the "teas" continued at the homes of Mrs. S.C. Upton (2037 E. Ocean); Mrs. Sarah Powers (1620 E. Seventh); Mrs. Frank Klecker (769 Orange); Mrs. C.F. Bruce (527 E. First); Mrs. Henry (336 E. Seventh); Mrs. R.S. Oakford (905 Locust); Mrs. M.A. English (419 W. Second); Mrs. Charles Spence (421 W. Third); Mrs. L.A. Helm (654 Cedar); and Mrs. Frederick Baker (911 Pacific). Newspapers reported "The ladies are very enthusiastic in their work and are meeting with success on every hand and the cooperation of the men generally."

Adelaide Tichenor founded the Ebell Society Club of Long Beach in 1896 and opened up her homes including, 852 E Ocean Blvd, to hundreds of women who came to hear talks on many issues.

Hundreds of members of the State Federation of Women's Clubs met in May 1911 at the Hotel Virginia on Ocean and by a large vote endorsed suffrage. The same year, the Long Beach Suffrage Society was established and its headquarters placed in the First National Bank Building at First and Pine. Ads were placed in local newspaper telling voters they could stop by of call Home Phone 1119 or Sunset 661 for directions or rides to polling places.

Suffrage supporters and members of the Nonpartisan League of Long Beach rallied at the Municipal Auditorium (adjacent to Pine Avenue Pier) in support of Long Beach's first woman candidate, Mabel Taylor in 1911.